Clements Center
Clements Center

Press

Intelligence Studies Project Posts Results of Third-Annual Survey of Public Attitudes on US Intelligence

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Sep 10, 2020

Intelligence Studies Project Director Steve Slick and LBJ School Associate Professor Josh Busby recently published with the Chicago Council of World Affairs the results of ISP’s third-annual national poll measuring the public’s views on US intelligence. 

Senior Fellow Jim Golby pens article for Washington Post on Civil-Military Relations

Sep 10, 2020

Clements Center Senior Fellow Jim Golby explores the military's role in politics in "Trump allegedly disparaged America’s war dead. The backlash probably won’t decide the election." published in the Washington Post.

Senior Undergraduate Fellow tackle "Post-Pandemic National Security" in Article for Real Clear Defense

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Sep 10, 2020

Senior Undergraduate Fellows Archit Oswal, Madison Lockett, Peter Denham, Nicholas Romanow, Soren Ettinger DeCou, and Caroline Nicholson collaborated on an article tackling the multi-faceted topic of "Post-Pandemic National Security" for Real Clear Defense. 

Announcing Class of 2020-2021 Predoctoral and Postdoctoral Fellows and New Staff

Sep 08, 2020

The Clements Center for National Security at the University of Texas at Austin welcomes its 2020-21 class of pre and postdoctoral fellows. Peter Slezkine of Columbia University and Theo Milonopoulos of Columbia University are this year’s predoctoral fellows. Jaehan Park of Johns Hopkins SAIS is an America in the World predoctoral fellow who will remain in residence with us at the Clements Center. Dr. Emily Whalen (University of Texas) and Dr. Max von Bargen (Ohio State University) are this year’s postdoctoral fellows while 2019-2020 postdoctoral fellow Dr. deRasimes Combes (American University) has extended her fellowship through December. The Clements Center also welcomes Eli Lake to the team as our National Security Journalism Fellow.

Topics You’re Not Supposed to Discuss at Dinner: The Role of Evangelical Religion in U.S. Foreign Policy

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Sep 04, 2020

In the latest episode of Horns of Dilemma, Will Inboden, editor-in-chief of the Texas National Security Review, and Ashlyn Hand, a Ph.D. candidate at the LBJ School at the University of Texas at Austin, speak with Lauren Turek, a professor at Trinity University, about her new book, To Bring the Good News to All Nations: Evangelical Influence on Human Right on US Foreign Relations.

American foreign policy has often had a strong religious component, whether that be in the form of manifest destiny, or in the idea of American exceptionalism. But as Turek documents, in the late 20th century, the specific notion of human rights intersected with evangelical missionaries and their perceptions of the risks associated with communism and other important foreign policy questions, and were able to organize and influence U.S. foreign policy in a new and important way.