Clements Center
Clements Center

Press

Sovereignty Sharing in Fragile States Podcast

Nov 05, 2019

Sovereignty as a concept conveys that a single entity has the legitimate authority to exercise governance over a particular territory. So, how can an exclusive individual right be shared? John Ciorciari, associate professor at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan and director of the Weiser Diplomacy Center and the International Policy Center, explores these questions at a talk he recently gave at the University of Texas. Specifically, he asks what sovereignty sharing is and why it matters, and what the conditions are under which it could work. Ciorciari uses examples from Cambodia, Liberia, and Guatemala to illustrate what sovereignty sharing looks like in practice, and why it matters. This talk took place at the University of Texas at Austin and was sponsored by the Clements Center.

Executive Director Will Inboden and Academic Board Member Peter Feaver author new op-ed on Syria for Foreign Policy

Nov 04, 2019

In their latest article for FP's "Elephants in the Room", Inboden and Feaver argue that foreign policy realists have failed to properly account for the costs of U.S. troop withdrawal from Syria. 

Law and National Security: Legitimacy, Security, and ‘Tom Clancy Stuff’ podcast

Oct 23, 2019

In this episode of Horns of a Dilemma, TNSR‘s executive editor, Doyle Hodges, sits down with Laurie Blank, clinical professor of law and director of the International Law Clinic at Emory University, and Bobby Chesney, Clements Center faculty fellow and Strauss Center director. They discuss the field of national security law broadly, including why Americans have turned increasingly to law to address questions related to national security, even as public confidence in institutions associated with law has declined. They also dive into how law confers legitimacy on the process of national security decision-making and what the limitations of law are in addressing national security questions. Join us for a fascinating discussion on law, security, technology, and society.

2020 Summer Seminar in History and Statecraft application open now through February 20th

Oct 21, 2019

Applications are now open for our 2020 Summer Seminar program. Apply by Monday, February 10th.

Call for Papers: Restraint and National Security

Oct 18, 2019

The Clements Center for National Security, the Strauss Center for International Security and Law, the Intelligence Studies Project, and the Department of History at the University of Texas at Austin in partnership with the Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins; the Duke University Program in American Grand Strategy; and the Texas A&M Albritton Center for Grand Strategy invite graduate students and young professionals to submit proposals for a one-day conference on the theme of restraint. The conference will explore the intent, the causes, and the consequences of restraint in foreign engagement in the course of American history. While the conference is primarily interested in examples of U.S. history, one session will address the theme of restraint in other contexts, too. Students are encouraged to present works in progress.